Masonry news

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Trees in the News!

Our very own WBRZ heard us shouting from the roof tops about our gorgeous trees, and they sent Brittany Weiss to investigate.

CHECK OUT THE STORY

Here’s How You Can Help Our Dying Trees!

Donate! To keep costs low, we must raise the funds to do an entire median at a time. It’s a $1,000 to prune, mulch and care for one (1) tree. You can donate any amount or adopt a whole tree at gdcabr.org/live-oaks.

Reach Out to Neighbors! Talk to your neighbors, peer pressure your loved ones, and help us keep the Garden District the beautiful place it is. If you live along a boulevard, please consider reaching out to your neighbors and adopting your median. We are also looking for big sponsors. The Garden District Civic Association created a non-profit to care for these majestic beasts so your donation is tax deductible!

Please contact the Board if you have any questions about the Collective or if you have any trouble donating at [email protected].

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Claire PittmanTrees in the News!
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June 2021 Drainage Update

This month, East Baton Rouge Parish’s Transportation and Drainage Director Fred Raiford updated GDCA on EBR’s work on drainage and how our neighborhood fits in to its larger plans.

A bit of orientation on drainage in the Garden District: Most of the Garden District, particularly Roseland Terrace and Drehr Place, drains towards Government Street which connects to Dawson Creek (the drainage canal that parallels Acadian Thruway) near Hearthstone Street by Catholic High School property. Other parts of the Garden District, predominantly Kleinert Terrace, also drain to Dawson Creek via Olive Street. Areas west of Park Boulevard generally drain west to Corporate Canal with the exception of areas closest to the park, which drain to the lakes.

Part of the identified problem for the Garden District and areas both upstream and immediately downstream is that the existing culverts on Dawson Creek at Broussard and Hundred Oaks Streets constrict flow. In heavy rain events water backs up and prevents the Garden District (the Government Street and the Olive Street outfalls) from draining. The city has identified funding opportunities to mitigate this issue in our area.  Forte & Tablada, Inc. was selected by the parish to do the design work and prepare the plans for the improvements in our area.

However, these projects may increase the volume of water that is able to travel downstream at one time, meaning there can be negative downstream impacts. The city does not just want to relocate a flooding problem so the timeline is uncertain. The proposed project from Dawson Creek from the Hundred Oaks Street area to Kenilworth Boulevard, which will also provide relief to our neighborhood, is still seeking funding and in turn, has an uncertain timeline.

It is clear that drainage problems associated with the Broussard St. and Hundred Oaks Ave culverts on Dawson Creek play a significant role in our neighborhood’s drainage problems. Additionally, there are questions about system capacity within the Garden District as well – our local system is quite old and it is likely sections of it do not have the capacity for the kinds of high intensity storms that are an increasing part of our lives every spring and summer.

We are encouraged by EBR’s plans for the bridges. Additionally, the EBR Stormwater Master Plan will provide some clarity to the full picture of our neighborhood’s drainage situation. Defining our problems is the first step. We encourage all in the neighborhood to stay involved and continue to advocate for solutions.

If you are interested in these issues or would like to speak to EBR leadership about them, please join the EBR Stormwater Master Plan Virtual Public Meeting this Thursday, June 24, at 6:00 PM. Register at stormwater.brla.gov. You can also learn more about the Stormwater Master Plan by visiting the Virtual Open House.

Summary of Issues

Dawson Creek

What we know: Damming at Broussard St. and Hundred Oaks cause backups in our neighborhood. This is a problem on the entire reach of Dawson Creek.

What EBR plans to do: Replace the bridges (funding identified), but on an uncertain timeline.

Capacity on Government St. and Connections

What we know: There are potential capacity issues.

What EBR plans to do: The EBR Stormwater Master Plan’s findings will bring clarity to the issues and future project development is dependent on the completion of that effort.

Local Conveyance/Pipe Capacity

What we know:  There are potential capacity issues in our existing stormwater drainage system. Some of the rain events we have had in the recent past have certainly exceeded local system capacity.

What EBR plans to do:  The EBR Stormwater Masterplan’s findings will bring clarity to the issues and future project development is dependent on the completion of that effort. In the meantime the parish cleaned out the drain boxes and piping on Cherokee Street in March and has identified other locations in the Garden District that will be cleared when funding becomes available.

Learn more about the Dawson Creek Bridge Projects.

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Claire PittmanJune 2021 Drainage Update
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5 Ways to Protect your Home and Combat Crime

It’s a fact: Crimes of all sorts rise in frequency in the summer months. Criminologists have outlined a variety of reasons for this, but the reality is that crime in the Garden District will increase in the summer, as it will everywhere else.

The best security is multi-layered. Knowing your neighbors and keeping an eye out for unusual activity is the first step. There are plenty of other ways we can reduce crime in the Garden District and beyond. Here are some suggestions:

  1. Get to know your property. Walk the perimeter of your house and check for obvious security problems. This could include a garage door that doesn’t close, a broken window, or even a hiding spot where a criminal could lay in wait.
  2. Reduce the opportunity. The easiest and most impactful way to reduce crime is to simply lock your doors and keep valuables out of sight. Most crimes are simply opportunity. That’s why criminals target vehicles and homes with valuable items left visibly on display, pulling handles looking for unlocked doors.
  3. Improve your lighting. Light is one of the single best deterrents to crime. The cost of running an LED light bulb is significantly less than the old incandescent bulbs, and there’s a myriad of switches that allow you to control security lighting intelligently.
  4. Check your locks. Most hardware store-grade can be bumped or picked within seconds. A qualified locksmith can make recommendations about higher quality locks that can better secure your home.
  5. Secure your valuables. Criminals know to look in dresser drawers, in the freezer, in the backs of closets, and in the other hiding spots that most people employ. A high quality home safe—bolted to the floor and the wall—will deter all but the most determined criminals.
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Claire Pittman5 Ways to Protect your Home and Combat Crime
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