Historical Resources

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  • Baton Rouge Historic Preservation Commission: The East Baton Rouge Parish Historic Preservation Commission was established by the Metropolitan Council in August, 2004. The Historic Preservation Commission is considered a part of the planning functions of City Parish Government, and is administrated by the staff of the Office of the Planning Commission.
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  • National Alliance of Preservation Commissions: The NAPC is the only organization devoted solely to representing the nation’s preservation design review commissions. NAPC provides technical support and manages an information network to help local commissions accomplish their preservation objectives. The Alliance also serves as an advocate at federal, state and local levels of government to promote policies and programs that support preservation commission efforts.
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  • National Register Plaques for Your Home: As of March 5,1998, Kleinert Terrace was put on the National Register of Historic Places. Drehr Place was effective November 13, 1997 and Roseland Terrace was listed back in March 1982. Now that all three neighborhoods which make up the Garden District are listed on the National Register, many of us are eligible to display a plaque stating that our property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Each house was labeled as either contributing or non-contributing upon nomination and marked as such on a neighborhood map. The Louisiana Department of Cultural Development made this determination. If your house was considered contributing and has not undergone any major modifications affecting its character since, you may display the plaque. To find out your house’s designation you may contact the LA Office of Historic Preservation 342-8160. The most common reason for not being able to display a plaque is that your home was not old enough, at least 50 years, at the nomination date or does not have architectural significance. Once you find out if you house qualifies for a plaque, you can choose one from any of the companies that make them. There are many sizes and types available. Prices for the plaques start at $50 and can go as high as $500, depending on the size and customization you choose.
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  • National Trust for Historic Preservation: The National Trust for Historic Preservation provides leadership, education, advocacy, and resources to save America’s diverse historic places and revitalize our communities. The National Trust for Historic Preservation is a private, nonprofit membership organization dedicated to saving historic places and revitalizing America’s communities. Recipient of the National Humanities Medal, the Trust was founded in 1949 and provides leadership, education, advocacy, and resources to protect the irreplaceable places that tell America’s story. Staff at the Washington, DC, headquarters, six regional offices and 29 historic sites work with the Trust’s 270,000 members and thousands of preservation groups in all 50 states. The need for the National Trust for Historic Preservation has increased since its founding in 1949. When historic buildings and neighborhoods are torn down or allowed to deteriorate, a part of our past disappears forever. When that happens, we lose history that helps us know who we are, and we lose opportunities to live and work in the kinds of interesting and attractive surroundings that older buildings can provide.
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  • Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans: The mission of the Preservation Resource Center: To promote the preservation, restoration, and revitalization of New Orleans’ historic architecture and neighborhoods. We at the PRC believe that preserving a city’s architecture is tantamount to preserving its soul. New Orleans would not be the city we love today without the past successes of the PRC, and it is critical that we maintain our staunch defense of the city’s rich architectural legacy. In post-Katrina New Orleans, it is particularly crucial that we rebuild in a way that is sensitive to our past, or we risk losing everything that makes our city unique.
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  • Sanborn Maps of MidCity Redevelopment: This is a link to the Sanborn maps which an insurance company made. They are from 1923 and 1947. A few of them have our neighborhood in them. They show where there were houses and garages. There was the Darling Lumber Co. on Gov. & 15th and a fire station next to it. Map lovers and historians will love browsing through them.
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John WilliamsHistorical Resources